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  #221  
Old 11-07-2017, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spike1007 View Post
A couple of days ago, I missed STRONGHEARTEDNESSES. I saw it with too little time left to type. Not as good as yours, but it hadn't been found before on that board. I'm still kicking myself.

I took some undergraduate chemistry, but never any organic chemistry. I read some science magazines & books these days, but I think I pick up more new words here. (Not that I'll know what they mean, but at least I can sound smart.)
Love CHICKENHEARTEDNESSES, and Spike, I'm sure you'll get STRONGHEARTEDNESSES next time. The closest I've gotten to those was ROUNDHEADEDNESS.

My undergraduate major was math/computer science so it's not of much help here. I took physics & chemistry in high school but that was almost 50 years ago. However, my brothers and I have recently had some medical issues and lots of ensuing tests, so I've picked up a lot of the word parts used in medical jargon. Hey, there's an upside to everything!
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  #222  
Old 11-07-2017, 11:22 AM
Spike1007 Spike1007 is offline
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Originally Posted by mcdonna View Post
Love CHICKENHEARTEDNESSES, and Spike, I'm sure you'll get STRONGHEARTEDNESSES next time. The closest I've gotten to those was ROUNDHEADEDNESS.

My undergraduate major was math/computer science so it's not of much help here. I took physics & chemistry in high school but that was almost 50 years ago. However, my brothers and I have recently had some medical issues and lots of ensuing tests, so I've picked up a lot of the word parts used in medical jargon. Hey, there's an upside to everything!
I'm always on the lookout for -HEARTEDNESS(ES) and -HEADEDNESS(ES). Thanks for your encouragement.

My background is also in math/computer science. (Emphasis on math (graduate degrees there), but mostly working on developing & programming fast iterative solution methods for large linear systems. (If that means anything to anyone here, I'd love to hear it.) I still use Fortran, since I learned that over 40 years ago.) You're right, that doesn't help much in WordTwist. Luckily, my medical issues so far have been minimal, so that doesn't help here either.

Last edited by Spike1007 : 11-07-2017 at 11:33 AM.
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  #223  
Old 11-07-2017, 11:51 AM
lalatan lalatan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spike1007 View Post
I'm always on the lookout for -HEARTEDNESS(ES) and -HEADEDNESS(ES). Thanks for your encouragement.
I think I've played most of the -HEARTEDNESS(ES) words: CHICKEN, STOUT, STRONG, BIG, SOFT, BROKEN, LARGE. And most of the -HANDEDNESS(ES) words: LEFT, RIGHT, EVEN, SURE, UNDER. 2 weeks ago I saw -HANDEDNESS but couldn't pair it with anything. After time ran out, I saw fore in the wordlist so I checked FOREHANDEDNESS in lexic.us and it was there. So that irked me. This week I got the same board and nobody else had played it yet. Yay! 26 pts 2 records
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  #224  
Old 11-07-2017, 12:01 PM
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Woohoo! I just played PHILOSOPHER for 10 pts and the longest word record. Then I tried NONPHILOSOPHER and got 26 pts and 2 records. Oh the difference 3 ltrs can make!

Last edited by lalatan : 11-07-2017 at 12:05 PM.
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  #225  
Old 11-07-2017, 01:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spike1007 View Post
My background is also in math/computer science. (Emphasis on math (graduate degrees there), but mostly working on developing & programming fast iterative solution methods for large linear systems. (If that means anything to anyone here, I'd love to hear it.) I still use Fortran, since I learned that over 40 years ago.)
So "developing & programming" means something to me, as do "fast iterative solution methods" and "large linear systems." But putting them together is not something I've any experience with. And surprisingly, I've never programmed in Fortran. I used ALGOL-60 in a summer math institute between Jr/Sr high school years back in 1967. Then no more computers until I went back to college in 1980, and by then Pascal was the "learning language" of choice there. Loved Pascal, Lisp, MAINSAIL, dabbled in assembly, APL, SNOBOL and Java, got along with C and C++, and have learned to put up with PHP & Javascript the last 15 years as I've been doing mostly web development. If I were going to program just for fun, I'd probably pick up pure functional Lisp again.

According to lexic.us, PASCAL is accepted (unit of pressure); JAVASCRIPT is definitely a proper noun, and ALGOL is probably considered proper. And So not much Boggle fodder there.

Of course, there's also ALGOLOGY, the branch of botany that studies algae and ALGOMETRY, measuring sensitivity to pain or pressure, and all the variants of each.

So many words!
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  #226  
Old 11-07-2017, 01:45 PM
Spike1007 Spike1007 is offline
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My introduction to computer science came about half way between your high school years & your return to college. I was introduced to some other languages (in a more theoretical rather than hand-on way) in some classes. I did a little in BASIC & assembly, but mostly in Fortran. (I saw & did some with Pascal, but not enough to like it.) I've done some C. That's similar to Fortran, but by then I could program so much better & faster in Fortran. I never got along with C++ (I couldn't get along with object-oriented stuff). Anyway, a combination of being lazy & having Fortran the dominant language for scientific programming kept me with that. (I'll use some later versions if necessary, but I mainly stick to Fortran 77.)

By the way, I'm impressed that you actually had some computer exposure back in high school. I was a few years into college before I had any.

I'm sure that this is less-than-fascinating reading for others, so I'll stop.

Last edited by Spike1007 : 11-07-2017 at 02:14 PM.
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  #227  
Old 11-09-2017, 07:07 PM
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Just played an amazing board ... got 237 points for 8 words:

LEGIBLENESSES (19)
ILLEGIBLENESS (24)
ILLEGIBLENESSES (28)
INELIGIBLENESSES (30)
INTELLIGIBLENESS (30)
INTELLIGIBLENESSES (34)
UNINTELLIGIBLENESS (34)
UNINTELLIGIBLENESSES (38)

INELIGIBLENESSES and LEGIBLENESSES were new finds after 32 plays; the others had been played already.

A great board to end the day with!
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  #228  
Old 11-09-2017, 08:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkbig View Post
Nice to see you back on the forum today. Congrats on your find! I actually pieced together MYOGRAPHICALLY (26 pts) on 1 board because I had seen the word you came up with beforehand. I recently got POLYPHENOL by piecing it together. One of my weaknesses is chemistry words so I was pleased with that, although maybe I missed something longer.
I played CHICKENHEARTEDNESSES (39 pts 2 records) earlier today on a new recycled game. Seems to be the most valuable of the -HEARTEDNESSES words.
I think I just played the same game today (without reading your post, by the way) and found CHICKENHEARTEDNESSES too.
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  #229  
Old 11-10-2017, 06:05 AM
lalatan lalatan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdonna View Post
Just played an amazing board ... got 237 points for 8 words:

LEGIBLENESSES (19)
ILLEGIBLENESS (24)
ILLEGIBLENESSES (28)
INELIGIBLENESSES (30)
INTELLIGIBLENESS (30)
INTELLIGIBLENESSES (34)
UNINTELLIGIBLENESS (34)
UNINTELLIGIBLENESSES (38)

INELIGIBLENESSES and LEGIBLENESSES were new finds after 32 plays; the others had been played already.

A great board to end the day with!
Wow! You mined that board for all it was worth. WTG! That would have bumped up your avg/word significantly.
Until I read this today I was happy I found IMPRESSIONABILITIES (36 pts) to end my night yesterday. haha There seemed to be no other abilities available.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrPlacebo View Post
I think I just played the same game today (without reading your post, by the way) and found CHICKENHEARTEDNESSES too.
We all seem to be playing the same games usually within 3 days of each other. It's a phenomenon I have observed repeatedly.

Last edited by lalatan : 11-10-2017 at 06:08 AM.
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  #230  
Old 11-10-2017, 07:36 AM
crazykatePremium Member crazykate is offline
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PALEOCLIMATOLOGISTS, for 36 points, is one of my favourite -ologists. Got two new records for it as well (sorry, lalatan!)
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